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FoundationOne in breast cancer

FoundationOne can potentially match clinically relevant alterations found in breast cancer samples to novel, targeted treatments and clinical trials. This can then assist the physician in tailoring patient management.1,9

To date, FoundationOne has generated over xxx breast cancer profiles. These data continue to facilitate the advancement of FoundationCORE, the Foundation Medicine comprehensive genomic database.6  

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Clinical relevance of FoundationOne in breast cancer

FoundationOne has been shown to detect genomic alterations in recurrent and metastatic breast cancer that would not be detected by other diagnostic approaches, such as FISH or IHC.9

FoundationOne has been shown to identify a variety of actionable driver mutations in triple-negative breast cancers, further expanding the role of comprehensive genomic profiling in breast cancers.21 The ability to detect these genomic drivers in breast cancer samples could help physicians to tailor patient management.

Advances in genomic profiling have enabled the identification of more targetable alterations in breast cancer than with more traditional diagnostic approaches.9,22 For example, in a single study of 100 breast cancer tumours, the use of whole exome sequencing identified nine new alterations.22  The identification of additional alterations may provide the physician with a wider variety of targeted treatment options, tailored to the individual patient. 

Frequency of somatic mutations based on the genomic outline of
human breast tumours as part of the Cancer Genome Atlas Network23

Adapted from Eralp Y., 2016.23

 

 

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FoundationOne could expand treatment options for breast cancer patients

FoundationOne has been shown to identify alterations that had not been previously detected with traditional testing methods, across several cancer types, thereby identifying additional targets for effective therapy options.2,18,24,25  FoundationOne is suitable for the profiling of all types of breast cancer tumours, including familial, inflammatory, lobular and triple-negative breast cancer types.1,9,26 FoundationOne can also assist in identifying alterations present in patients with stage 4/metastatic breast cancer and particularly in BRCA1 and BRCA2 hereditary breast cancers.9,26,27

As the fraction of known cancer genes grows, the number of targets for specific therapies increases and the feasibility of predetermined testing, such as hotspot profiling, for each individual alteration decreases.5,8,10,11 In order to identify the most appropriate targeted treatment, there is a need for an accurate diagnostic test that identifies all clinically relevant alterations.5,8

Is FoundationOne suitable for all cancer types?

FoundationOne is suitable for all solid cancer types, including rare cancers and cancers of unknown origin, and in recurrent or metastatic solid tumour cancers.1,7 FoundationOne can be used to profile all types of breast cancer tumours, including familial, inflammatory, lobular and triple-negative breast cancer types.9,26,27

FoundationOne can be especially useful in cases where there are many possible treatment options to choose between, limited treatment options or where the solid tumour has uncommon or rare alterations that are not routinely tested for.1,7

FoundationOne is suitable for all solid cancer types, including rare cancers and cancers of unknown origin, and in recurrent or metastatic solid tumour cancers. FoundationOne can be used to profile all types of breast cancer tumours, including familial, inflammatory, lobular and triple-negative breast cancer types.11,14

FoundationOne can be especially useful in cases where there are many possible treatment options to choose between, limited treatment options or where the solid tumour has uncommon or rare alterations that are not routinely tested for.

References
  1. FoundationOne technical information.
  2. Rozenblum AB et al. J Thorac Oncol 2017; 2:258–268 (and supplementary material).
  3. Chalmers ZR et al. Genome Med 2017; 9:34.
  4. Genomeweb. Foundation Medicine Q3 revenues up 45 percent. Available at: https://www.genomeweb.com/molecular-diagnostics/foundation-medicine-q3-revenues-45-percent [accessed November 2017].
  5. Frampton, GM et al. Nat Biotechnol 2013; 31:1023–1031
  6. Foundation Medicine. FoundationCORE press release, June 2016.
  7. Schwaederle M et al. Mol Cancer Ther 2015; 14:1488–1494.
  8. Drilon A et al. Clin Cancer Res 2015; 16:3631–3639.
  9. Ross JS et al. Cancer 2016; 17:2654–2562.
  10. Hirsch FR et al. Lancet 2016; 388:1012–1024.
  11. Aitken M et al. Global Oncology Trend Report 2015. Available at: http://keionline.org/sites/default/files/IIHI_Oncology_Trend_Report_2015.pdf (accessed November 2017).
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  13. Bishop R. Bioscience Horizons 2010; 1:85–95.
  14. Chen AY-Y and Chen A. J Invest Dermatol 2013; 133:e8.
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  18. Ali SM et al. Oncologist 2016; 6:762–670.
  19. Suh JH et al. The Oncologist 2016; 21:684–691.
  20. National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) NSCLC guidelines, Version 9, 2017.
  21. Dillon JL et al. The Breast 2016; 29:202–207.
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  23. Eralp Y. Tranl Oncogenomics 2016; 8:1–7.
  24. Schrock AB et al. Clin Cancer Res 2016; 13:3281–3215.
  25. Chmielecki J et al. Oncologist 2015; 20:7–12.
  26. Yuan Y et al. Oncotarget 2012: doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.14476.
  27. Roche Foundation Medicine data on file.
  28. Masucci GV et al. Int J Immunother Cancer Res 2016; 4:16.
  29. National Cancer Institute (NIH). NCI dictionary of cancer terms. Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms?cdrid=285933 [accessed November 2017].
  30. Sinicrope FA. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2010; 7:174–177.
  31. The Cancer Genome Atlas Network, Nature 2012; 487:330–337.